Businesses Re-Open in Kentucky

Lidvina+Mikulic%2C+Army+and+Air+Force+Exchange+Service+concessionaire%2C+helps+a+customer+at+the+Base+Exchange+at+Ramstein+Air+Base%2C+Germany%2C+April+21%2C+2020.+Host+nation+policies+directed+business+staff+to+wear+face+coverings%2C+maintain+physical+distancing+and+limit+the+number+of+customers+to+help+aid+the+fight+against+coronavirus+disease+2019.+%28U.S.+Air+Force+photo+by+Senior+Airman+Elizabeth+Baker%29

Senior Airman Elizabeth Baker

Lidvina Mikulic, Army and Air Force Exchange Service concessionaire, helps a customer at the Base Exchange at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, April 21, 2020. Host nation policies directed business staff to wear face coverings, maintain physical distancing and limit the number of customers to help aid the fight against coronavirus disease 2019. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Elizabeth Baker)

By now, almost everyone is tired of the restrictions in place due to the  Covid-19 outbreak and we all wantnt to get back to life as we previously knew it.

The businesses that have remained open had to take extra precautions that are now mandatory. Starting May 11, all Kentucky workers and customers inside essential businesses will be required to wear cloth masks.  Governor Beshear also announced that if a business is not masking, the business could be forced to temporarily shut down. Grocery stores and other forward-facing business can refuse to serve someone not wearing a mask.

The governor also delivered a little good news this Monday. He revealed plans for phase one of the re-opening which included many non-emergency health care services.  Phase 2 will begin on May 6 and will allow outpatient surgery, ambulatory and invasive procedures to resume. Phase 3 is scheduled to start May 13 and allows hospitals and care facilities to begin performing non-emergency surgeries and procedures at half of the rate they did before the pandemic. Phase 4 is set to begin May 27th,  when most of the restrictions on types of procedures and how much you can do will be left to the facilities to decide. However, oversight about procedures and safety will still be monitored.

Senior Nathan Maggard has been following the governor’s response to the virus and thinks that this is “what needs to be done” to help the economy. Grayson Collins, 10, feels the same and says that “people need to work, and if we can do it safely then we should open them back up. Elijah Hammond, 10 feels the same way and said that “people need to put food back on the table”. No matter what views you have, we can all agree that we want everything to be back to normal soon.