Are Food Delivery Services Taking Over?

With+a+click+on+their+phone%2C+students+and+others+can+order+food+from+some+of+their+favorite+restaurants.
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Are Food Delivery Services Taking Over?

With a click on their phone, students and others can order food from some of their favorite restaurants.

With a click on their phone, students and others can order food from some of their favorite restaurants.

With a click on their phone, students and others can order food from some of their favorite restaurants.

With a click on their phone, students and others can order food from some of their favorite restaurants.

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A few years ago, if you were unable to drive and pick up your own food, your options for delivery were strictly limited to pizza or Chinese takeout. However, with the emergence of food delivery services such as Doordash, Uber Eats, Postmates, and Grub Hub, you have more than 100 restaurants at your service with just the click of a button.
Although you can not order food from every restaurant, these services offer access to every type of food you could be craving. Chipotle, Chick-fil-A, McDonald’s, Starbucks, and even local places, such as The Press Juice Bar, can all be accessed by these delivery services.

These companies are becoming increasingly popular with the younger generations due to convenience. A single click on your smart phone can get you an entire dinner within the next hour. This has proved extremely helpful for LCA students who are balancing school and extracurricular activities, which leave little or no time for dinner. Thanks to these delivery services, busy students will no longer have to wait until they get home to have dinner.

Senior Erin Oliver says, “Doordash is such an easy and exciting way to eat. It’s helpful if you are in a new place and are unsure about the food options there. I personally have never had an issue with it, and it has always been reliable. I would recommend it to anyone and would encourage people to try it out!”

Senior Hope Marcum shares the same opinion, “Doordash is amazing, especially when you go to LCA and are close to everything!”

Recently I attended a school conference and was not impressed by the food that was available for purchase. Fortunately, all I had to do was download the Doordash app, pick the restaurant I wanted, and order off the menu. The delivery service provided the food I wanted, still warmed, in a timely and professional fashion. The only downside to the delivery service was the confusion the deliverer had in finding me in the hotel. Although we had each other’s numbers, it still proved difficult to find one another in the hotel. Despite some general confusion, the delivery service is still extremely convenient.

This convenience comes with a price, however. Using a deliver service can make your meal cost significantly more than if you were to buy the food yourself. For example, I ordered from Smashburger for my friend and me. The total cost of the food was $22.84. However, with the costs of tax, a service fee, and a tip, the total came out to be $30.46. I had also received free delivery on this order, due to it being my first order from this restaurant, but the fee can be anywhere from $1.99 to $5.99. Doordash has just released a membership of sorts to help stifle those pesky delivery costs. It’s called “DashPass” and for $9.99 a month you can order from over 100 restaurants around you with no delivery fees on orders over $15. You can also receive lower service fees.

Ten years ago it would have been unthinkable to have a full meal with just the touch of a button, yet with the rising popularity of such services, it seems the unthinkable has come a reality. As technology becomes more innovative and convenient, more Americans rely on it for basic necessities. I am guilty of this, as I mentioned above, due to its usefulness and practicality. However, too much dependence on artificial intelligence not only leaves me curious for the future, but also deeply concerned. What does this look like for future America and how convenient is “too” convenient?